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How to Write a Stub

Sometimes you might have an idea for a Gatsby.js documentation page or agree upon a suggestion in a GitHub issue, but don’t have the time or resources to write that page yourself. Rather than let the idea drift off into space, consider creating a documentation stub to act as a content placeholder. That way, other members of the community (and/or you, in the future) can come back and fill in the details.

A stub is a temporary placeholder for a piece of Gatsby.js documentation tied to a GitHub issue, using this format (feel free to copy and paste, changing the title and issue number):

how-to-tame-dragons.md
---
title: How to Tame Dragons
issue: https://github.com/gatsbyjs/gatsby/issues/XXXX
---
This is a stub. Help our community expand it.
Please use the [Gatsby Style Guide](/contributing/gatsby-style-guide/) to ensure your
pull request gets accepted.

If you have any questions about titles or other details related to creating stubs, feel free to ask us on a relevant GitHub issue.

Community Pair Programming Sessions

If you create a stub or see an existing one on the Gatsby.js site and feel interested in filling out the content, check out the Gatsby.js Pair Programming program. We would love to work with you in your open source contributing journey!

Converting a Stub to a Doc

To change a stub into a living-breathing document, remove the issue entry from a stub’s frontmatter (a fancy name for Markdown metadata) and replace the boilerplate content with your wonderful prose and code. Save the file, commit to GitHub, open a PR, get feedback. Learn more in our page on docs contributions.

If you wish to see any of the available stubs, head over to the current Stub List.


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